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Attention New and Expectant Moms

Do you have low back pain?

Low back and pelvic pain is common during pregnancy or after delivery, but most women can be successfully treated with rehabilitation!

If your back or pelvic pain worsens with getting up from a chair, rolling in bed, getting in and out of the care, lifting up one leg, or walking, your pain may be caused by pelvic girdle dysfunction, a common musculoskeletal condition that occurs in pregnancy due to strain on the pelvic joints.

Do you have "Pelvic Girdle Dysfunction"?

Test yourself!

If any of these maneuvers reproduce your pain, you may be a good candidate for treatment of pelvic girdle dysfunction*.

RIC's women's health rehabilitation - pelvic girdle dysfunction

Test #1

Lie on your back. Bring one leg up to 90 degrees, with your knee bent as pictured. Use both hands to apply firm pressure downward on knee toward the floor/bed.

If lying on your back causes dizziness or lightheadedness, do not do this maneuver.

RIC's women's health rehabilitation - pelvic girdle dysfunction

Test #2

While in hands and knees position, lift one leg straight back.

RIC's women's health rehabilitation - pelvic girdle dysfunction

Test #3

Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat. Lift your hips up from the floor/bed. If you are able, extend one leg.

If lying on your back causes dizziness or lightheadedness, do not perform this maneuver.

RIC's women's health rehabilitation - pelvic girdle dysfunction

Test #4

For pubic pain: While standing, reach your foot out to the side and pull it back to the center as if you are pulling a mat in with your foot.

How did you do?

If any of the maneuvers above reproduce your back or pelvic pain, one of our Women’s Health Rehabilitation specialists can help!

Contact your obstetrician or midwife to request a referral to RIC for a comprehensive musculoskeletal evaluation. Call 312-238-1000 to schedule an evaluation today!


*Adapted from Olsen MF, et al. Self-administered tests as a screening procedure for pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain. Eur Spine J. 2009;18:1121–1129